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PSA: Mental Health, Suicidal Thoughts, Depression, etc.

This can be a particularly depressing season–whether because of the gray weather, feeling alone during the holidays, becoming emotionally drained during the holidays, or post-holiday mental crashing.

If you don’t have someone to talk to or you feel you can’t talk to people around you, consider calling a hotline.

One place to find suicide hotlines is SuicideHotlines.com. They’ll take your call even if you’re not actively planning or threatening to kill yourself. You don’t need to feel guilty about calling.

The two biggest national ones are: 1-800-784-2433 (1-800-SUICIDE) and 1-800-273-8255 (1-800-273-TALK).

If you have more time, are in less of a crisis, and feel guilty about calling a hotline, there are also mental health “warmlines.” It takes a little more google work to find those and they’re often local to your area. They can help you find clinics and the like as well as provide a place to talk. But if you can’t find one, call a hotline.

Mental illness isn’t a personal flaw, it’s an illness. Maybe for you it’s just like a cold, something to get over quickly. Or maybe it’s a chronic illness. It’s not a personal failing. If you need to talk to someone, do so.

For a little Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, try this site that GRS linked to earlier today.

From Plonkee:

If you’re in the UK, you can call the Samaritans on 08457 90 90 90.

For numbers elsewhere in the world go to www.befrienders.org.

If you find it difficult to talk, you can email joe@samaritans.org

photo by dailyinvention


{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

plonkee December 28, 2007 at 5:11 am

If you’re in the UK, you can call the Samaritans on 08457 90 90 90.

For numbers elsewhere in the world go to http://www.befrienders.org.

If you find it difficult to talk, you can email joe@samaritans.org

CatherineL December 29, 2007 at 6:54 am

Great post Mrs M – many sufferers don’t have friends or family who understand, so they don’t get the help they need. And this is a bad time of year – lack of sunlight really doesn’t help.

Interestingly, many sufferers I have spoken to also get really down in Spring. Some say that when the weather is improving – people generally seem happier and that makes them feel even worse.

I just read a great novel which covered mental health issues. It is The Almost Moon by Alice Sebold.

mrsmicah December 29, 2007 at 10:17 pm

I actually get the most depressed in the summer. I don’t know why, but it seems like the brightness and heat will never end. I’ve heard it called SSAD. Apparently, like SAD, it has to do with the amount of sunlight and the sun’s relation to the earth.

baby girl April 6, 2011 at 9:28 am

Dont do it
you have people that love you theres no point in it.. please call the hotline or a very close frined
or YOUR MOMMM.
keep her in mind.

baby girl April 6, 2011 at 9:30 am

your mom loves you soo much..
she brought you in this world
rember that
- signed sabrina & paige & Alexa (:

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